• Robin Long-Jordan, Digital Photograph, 2013
  • Robin Long-Jordan, Digital Photograph, 2013
  • Robin Long-Jordan, Digital Photograph, 2013
  • Robin Long-Jordan, Digital Photograph, 2013
  • Robin Long-Jordan, Digital Photograph, 2012

The confluence of traditionally craft­-based media and the ubiquity of the photographic image create a dialogue of subject, object and non-object within the modern portrait. The use of photography speaks to contem­porary expectations about easy sharing and digital access in both art and our interpersonal relationships. The increase in quality in entry­ level digital and cell phone cameras, leading to new ubiquity of the image, is at work in this project. While addressing the difficulty of sharing a three­-dimensional sculptural object through two-­dimensional means, the pho­tographs capitalize on advertising tricks learned and appropriated by entry ­level camera users in their own photos to create a controlled way for the sculptural object to be viewed. Taking advantage of the mallea­bility of scale and depth of field, the photo­ graphs create ideal conditions for the artist to communicate content, much in the same way that profile pictures in social media are used to control the information shared. Photography is used as a means to natural­ize the artificial, allowing the viewer to see the image of the doll in place the person represented. The lighting, background, and the completely unbelievable object, all point to the counterfeit. In the end, the digital portraits, seemingly removed as rep­resentations of representations, become what the images of advertising and social media always were; they are attractive but inscrutable, easily defiled by misappropri­ation and still unreachable. The subjects are vulnerable to the trust and goodwill of those with access while completely isolated from reality.

Madison, WI